Monthly Archives: November 2010

END:CIV – Documentary Film ‘Sneak Preview’ Screening November 15, 2010 at University of Victoria

END:CIV | ‘Sneak Preview’ Doc Film Screening | November 15, 2010
1:00pm @ UVic First Peoples House | FREE

On Monday, November 15th UVic will host a free “sneak preview” screening of END:CIV — a new documentary film by Franklin Lopez of Submedia.tv. The film “examines our culture’s addiction to systematic violence and environmental exploitation, and probes the resulting epidemic of poisoned landscapes and shell-shocked nations. Based in part on Endgame, the best-selling book by Derrick Jensen, END:CIV asks: “If your homeland was invaded by aliens who cut down the forests, poisoned the water and air, and contaminated the food supply, would you resist?”

END:CIV includes interviews with Paul Watson, Waziyatawin,  Gord Hill, Michael Becker, Peter Gelderloos, Lierre Keith, James Howard Kunstler, Stephanie McMillan, Qwatsinas, Rod Coronado, John Zerzan and more.

 

Derrick Jensen: November 17, 2010 at University of Victoria

More Indigenous-centred events are happening at the University of Victoria than ever before. Following Waziyatawin‘s talk November 2nd on Indigenous Peoples and Global Collapse, there will be two other notable events this month that will be well worth attending.

An Evening with Derrick Jensen | November 17, 2010
7:30pm @ UVic MacLaurin A144 | FREE

On Tuesday, November 17, 2010,  the University of Victoria will host a free talk with acclaimed author and activist Derrick Jensen. The talk is being presented by UVic’s Indigenous Governance program and Social Justice Studies.

Jensen is the author of 15 books, including Endgame, What We Leave Behind, A Language Older Than Words, The Culture of Make Believe, and Listening to the Land. He was one of two finalists for the 2003 J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize, which cited The Culture of Make Believe as “a passionate and provocative meditation on the nexus of racism, genocide, environmental destruction and corporate malfeasance, where civilization meets its discontents.” He is a revolutionary activist who has been hailed as the “philosopher poet of the environmental movement”.

But what does he have to say about Indigenous issues and struggles? Is his writing and activism relevant to Indigenous Peoples? Should we be listening to him? Come see what all the hype is about. There will be a Q & A after the talk, so you’ll have the chance to weigh in.